Can a Thorough Food Handling Course Help to Prevent Restaurant Workers From Infecting Customers With Foodborne Illnesses?

Written by Marty on . Posted in Food and hygiene course, Food handling course, Food safety course

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The ERS believes that the yearly economic cost of illness as a result of the E. coli bacteria is $478 million. That is an enormous expense, but still greater is the human cost of E. coli. E. Coli is a type of bacteria that is capable of producing a highly dangerous toxin. The symptoms of E. Coli include severe bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps. These symptoms typically appear two to three days after eating food that is contaminated with the bacteria. E. coli is believed to cause an estimated 73,000 cases of foodborne illness annually the United States. Sources of this deadly pathogen include beef, raw milk, and unpasteurized juices.

Meat that is not properly cooked at high enough temperatures is a notorious cause of foodborne illnesses like E. Coli. If you cook your own meat, you can make sure food is cooked at proper temperatures. However, if you go out to eat, you are forced to rely on someone you do not even know for the safety of your food. Thus, restaurant food safety should be of the utmost importance to all of us.

Luckily, a food serve worker can take a basic food handling course on the proper handling of food and sanitation practices. Every restaurant worker should be required to take such a food handling course. Many people believe that laws should be enacted requiring a yearly food handling course to be presented to all restaurant employees.

The United States Department of Agriculture reports that consumers spend an estimated 48 cents of every food dollar eating commercially prepared foods. Therefore, food handling safety training must be mandatory, and each commercial food prep worker should have to complete an annual food handling course. Hopefully, laws will be passed requiring this.

A thorough food handling course can help instill good habits in those who prepare commercial food products. Such habits include washing your hands with hot water and soap for a minimum of 20 seconds, both before and after handling food, and of course, after using the bathroom. Good hand washing practices go a long way towards preventing foodborne illness and should be extensively covered in any food handling course. Read more about this topic at this link: keepingitkleen.com

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Comments (5)

  • Jorge Barnett

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    I almost never eat out for exactly the reasons this article states. I do not want to get sick and I know to many people who have gotten really ill from restaurant food.

    Reply

  • Darryl Ford

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    I read about this like, 6 year old kid who died after being infected with E. Coli from a fast food hamburger while he was on vacation with his parents. And the food inductry barely got into any trouble at all. Just awful!

    Reply

  • Lester Oldson

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    I read about this like, 6 year old kid who died after being infected with E. Coli from a fast food hamburger while he was on vacation with his parents. And the food inductry barely got into any trouble at all. Just awful!

    Reply

  • Steven Perkins

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    I read about this like, 6 year old kid who died after being infected with E. Coli from a fast food hamburger while he was on vacation with his parents. And the food inductry barely got into any trouble at all. Just awful!

    Reply

  • Clifford Fleming

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    I read about this like, 6 year old kid who died after being infected with E. Coli from a fast food hamburger while he was on vacation with his parents. And the food inductry barely got into any trouble at all. Just awful!

    Reply

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